Avocado Roses & Scrambled Eggs Sourdough Toast [USA]

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Our neighborhood supermarket was having a 2 for $1.00 sale on avocados, so there was no way we can resist purchasing a small box for ourselves! Luckily we still had some sourdough bread leftover from an earlier grocery haul… and what do we do when we have avocados AND bread in the kitchen? We make avocado toast. With some time on our hands, we shaped the avocado slices into roses (you know, for the ‘gram), but don’t feel any pressure to do so when making your version of this recipe at home.

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Eggs & Asparagus Nest [USA]

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Asparagus and eggs, there’s no surprise why this combo has been served time and time again! Hint: it’s quick AND delicious. Today’s take was finished with a squeeze of fresh lime juice and a pinch of fleur de sel, but another great option is to top it with a generous grating of fresh Parmesan or if you have time to make the sauce, a spoonful of hollandaise. No plates needed here – we recommend serving it right in the skillet.

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Omelette Au Jambon Et Au Fromage [France]

 

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“Baveuse” – a French word used to describe perfectly cooked rolled omelettes where the exterior is smooth and uncolored and the interior is loose and slightly runny. To achieve this, make sure the pan you’re using is properly seasoned or opt for a nonstick pan. Then play with the heat. You want a nice, gentle heat so that the pan is thoroughly heated, but not too hot that the butter browns and colors the eggs when added.

Once you’ve mastered the technique, you can customize your omelette any way you like. We know it’s hard, but restraint in the amount of filling you add is key! We’ve been guilty of “unrollable” masses that ended up being diner omelettes (still delicious though!) as opposed to the more elegant rolled omelettes.

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Ijeh [Palestine or Syria]

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The exact origins of ijeh is hard to pinpoint with some cookbook authors claiming the dish to be an egg fritter from Palestine while others are sourcing it as a dish similar to latkes and originally from Syria. If any of you can clarify or have additional insight into this dish, please share with us in the comments below as we would love to know more!

The recipe that caught our eye can be found posted here by Refinery29, but the original comes from the book Palestine on a Plate by Joudie Kalla. Her take on ijeh is in the form of “Fluffy Egg Fritters with Tomato Salsa” and it is an absolutely fresh and comforting way to start the morning. We’ve adapted the recipe slightly based on how we approached the dish and to accommodate the ingredients in our pantry (because we did not have both fresh AND dried mint) and modified the amounts used based off of the size of our produce (our tomatoes and onions were quite large because God bless America). As with any recipe, feel free to tinker with it by adding or taking away ingredients according to your taste preferences.

We’ve followed the suggested hierarchy of fresh herb amounts by using a large handful of parsley, a small bunch of chives and even less mint leaves, but really, include as much or as little of each as you like. To get through the prep work quickly, have a large mixing bowl out for the ijeh ingredients and a smaller mixing bowl out for the salsa ingredients so that you can do the knife work for both at the same time since they share several ingredients.

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