Avocado Roses & Scrambled Eggs Sourdough Toast [USA]

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Our neighborhood supermarket was having a 2 for $1.00 sale on avocados, so there was no way we can resist purchasing a small box for ourselves! Luckily we still had some sourdough bread leftover from an earlier grocery haul… and what do we do when we have avocados AND bread in the kitchen? We make avocado toast. With some time on our hands, we shaped the avocado slices into roses (you know, for the ‘gram), but don’t feel any pressure to do so when making your version of this recipe at home.

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Eggs & Asparagus Nest [USA]

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Asparagus and eggs, there’s no surprise why this combo has been served time and time again! Hint: it’s quick AND delicious. Today’s take was finished with a squeeze of fresh lime juice and a pinch of fleur de sel, but another great option is to top it with a generous grating of fresh Parmesan or if you have time to make the sauce, a spoonful of hollandaise. No plates needed here – we recommend serving it right in the skillet.

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Omelette Au Jambon Et Au Fromage [France]

 

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“Baveuse” – a French word used to describe perfectly cooked rolled omelettes where the exterior is smooth and uncolored and the interior is loose and slightly runny. To achieve this, make sure the pan you’re using is properly seasoned or opt for a nonstick pan. Then play with the heat. You want a nice, gentle heat so that the pan is thoroughly heated, but not too hot that the butter browns and colors the eggs when added.

Once you’ve mastered the technique, you can customize your omelette any way you like. We know it’s hard, but restraint in the amount of filling you add is key! We’ve been guilty of “unrollable” masses that ended up being diner omelettes (still delicious though!) as opposed to the more elegant rolled omelettes.

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Huevos A La Rabona [Peru]

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Huevos a la Rabona is a simple breakfast dish made by the rabonas, the women who accompanied the Peruvian soldiers during war and military campaigns around the 19th century. Responsible for feeding the men, the rabonas created this satisfying dish that is quick to put together in the mornings and makes use of readily available ingredients from the region.

The bread, eggs, and onions are pantry staples in most kitchens, however the rocoto chile that is commonly grown along the west coast of Central and South America may prove a little more difficult to find. If you can’t find it at your farmer’s market or local grocery, you can substitute the rocoto chile with fresno or habanero.

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