Omelette Au Jambon Et Au Fromage [France]

 

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“Baveuse” – a French word used to describe perfectly cooked rolled omelettes where the exterior is smooth and uncolored and the interior is loose and slightly runny. To achieve this, make sure the pan you’re using is properly seasoned or opt for a nonstick pan. Then play with the heat. You want a nice, gentle heat so that the pan is thoroughly heated, but not too hot that the butter browns and colors the eggs when added.

Once you’ve mastered the technique, you can customize your omelette any way you like. We know it’s hard, but restraint in the amount of filling you add is key! We’ve been guilty of “unrollable” masses that ended up being diner omelettes (still delicious though!) as opposed to the more elegant rolled omelettes.

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Blueberry Mint Cream Cheese Galette [France]

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A galette is a free-form French tart and whether is it is filled with fruits, vegetables, dairy, or meats speaks to the personality of the baker. Galettes are rustically charming and incredibly forgiving to make. Ragged edges? Meh. Uneven folds? That’s okay too! The most important thing is to bake until the filling is gently bubbling and the crust reaches a beautiful golden brown color.

When combining the ingredients of the dough for the galette crust, try to handle it as little as possible. Overworking the dough will cause the development of too much gluten, which will result in an overly elastic dough that will shrink when baked and give you a tough crust instead of the tender, flaky crust that defines the best galettes.

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Gratin Dauphinois [France]

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From the historic French region of Dauphiné hails this decadent dish where layers upon layers of thinly sliced potatoes are embraced lovingly by milk, cream, and cheese before being baked to perfection. The creamy interior will have the faintest hint of garlic and nutmeg while the golden crust is all about the savory Gruyère cheese.

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When shopping for potatoes for this dish, go for a starchy potato such as the Idaho, Golden Wonder, or any type of Russet potato. Usually waxy potatoes are better suited for gratins, however, for this dish we need the extra starch to help thicken the sauce.

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